Posted by & filed under General, Hot Topics, Social.

 

Do our brains need a bit of processing uplift with an implant?

Do our brains need a bit of processing uplift with an implant?We’re looking at jobs this week. What was your reaction when (if) you heard the results of a survey by job search website that in the future 30 years from now, workers who chose to have technological implants will become our society’s biggest earners?

We’re looking at jobs this week. What was your reaction when (if) you heard the results of a survey by job search website xpatjobs.com that in the future 30 years from now, workers who chose to have technological implants will become our society’s biggest earners?

Was it:

How do you define biggest earners?
What, aren’t we robotic enough?
Good idea, make us robots?
Where do I sign up?

When you heard that the average working week could rise to over 50 hours a week (not to mention the must publicised opinions that today’s workers under 35 will have to work into their 70s, was it:

I work over 50 hours a week as it is?
That’s a good idea?
No way will that be acceptable?
Where are the new jobs coming from?

No Right Answers

Well, there are no right/wrong responses, only perceptions of available evidence which technology could all change anyway.

But the fact is that as the boundaries between so much of our world have already been blurred into submission, it may make sense for people to enhance their physical attributes to compete.

It may also be so that those who work longer, will be richer.

There are also some downsides in the survey. Additional brain processing power will be left with poorer eyesight, ‘smaller sexual organs and constantly furrowed brows due to the demands of mid-21st century life.’

That’s quite a price to pay for more wealth, isn’t it?

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
Job, employment, futurology type blogs already available:

The Future of Work In 5 Years Is Both Good News and Bad, 18 March 2014

If the Web Is Sometimes Too Much Hard Work for You, Help Is at Hand, 23 December 2013

Some People Have Seen the Future: It’s a Legal Minefield, 26 November 2013

In the Future, The Average Is History, the Machine Is King, 30 September 2013

Young and Unemployed? You Shouldn’t Be in This Digital Era! 17 September 2013

Robots Googling Each Other Was Only a Matter of Time, 21 May 2013

Cities of the Future Predictions Allow Some Fanciful Thinking, 30 April 2013

Changing Faces, Bodies, Minds and Social Habits of Human Beings in the Digital Age, 3 April 2013

Wanted: More British Inventors, Engineers and Designers As Everyone Can’t Be Web Entrepreneurs, 12 February 2013

The Longest Coffee Breaks in the World, 11 July 2012

Creative Arts On the Brain, Quite Literally, 18 June 2013

_____________________________________________________________________________________________
Super Working Class

According to yet another report, this time from Oxford University’s Sociology Working Papers, a ‘super class or elite’ is emerging of well-educated and wealthy professionals who choose to work longer hours to maintain lifestyles.

Not for them the shortening hours of technological benefits. Neither the need to slave for small rates in order to build up enough. No, these are people who find work emotionally and mentally satisfying than other activities.

These are people who do not bother much about entertainment, sport or culture, preferring the constant challenges and stimulations of work.

In history, it tended to be the other way round. Workers, tradespeople and the servants worked very long hours; the rich fewer, if at all. They did charity, arts, scientific study. That has been reversed.

Many of them see the working for money as more satisfying and profitable than other hobbies and distractions. The trend apparently crosses the gender divide equally.

The full paper is called Post-Industrious Society: Why Work Time Will Not Disappear for Our Grandchildren

Image: Glogger